Aside

lose the training wheels

Did anyone see this recent piece in the Washington Post about a bike-riding camp in Fairfax County designed to get kids with disabilities on bicycles? Pretty cool stuff.

Things like this make me wish so badly that it were easier to convey, see, and capitalize on the fact that bicycles are so unbelievably versatile, and that offer a rich variety of benefits to virtually everyone.

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6 responses to “lose the training wheels

  1. No need to head off to Farifax County, there’s a great organization closer to home working to get kids with physical and cognitive disabilities on bicycles. Check out our friends at PEAC: http://bikeprogram.org.

    Oh, and they turn out superstar bicycle advocates too…see our 2011 Bicycle Advocates of the Year: http://lmb.org/index.php/Blog/lmb-announces-2011-annual-awards.html

    • PEAC will be working with over 300 children with disabilities this year . Each childr has an individualized plan to achieve their cycling goals. Similar to the IEP used by schools special education programs, but focused only on cycling.
      Some student’s will learn to ride a tandem with the family. Other students will learn to pedal a trike. The most advanced students learn to use the bike to commute to work. We believe everyone can ride and it is our mission to empower individuals with disabilities through cycling.

    • Thanks, John! This is really great news. Thanks for dropping by and for sharing it with my readers. Keep up the good work.

  2. That is another great idea! As an educator you want all students to fit in and this helps all to level the playing field “so to speak”. As we all know the benefits far outweigh the negatives in getting anyone on a bike.
    On a semi related topic
    Here is what my daughter learned to ride with: http://www.thegyrobike.com/GYROWHEEL-Best-way-to-teach-a-kid-to-ride-a-bike-s/1.htm

  3. These look pretty cool, Kirk. I’ve never seen or heard of them before.

    Did you order yours online, or were you able to see on in person first? What sort of bike did you attach it to? How old was your daughter when she began using it, and how long did it take her to learn? What did you do with it when you were done?

    Sorry for all the questions, but I’m in the midst of trying to teach my girls to ride, and I’m interested in exploring anything that will assist (if not altogether guarantee success) in that endeavor.